Massaged Kale Salad

Week 7 Recipe

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Massaged kale salads are one of my favorite ways to enjoy kale. My favorite toppings are goat cheese or feta, dried cranberries, smoked salmon, and walnuts or hazelnuts with balsamic and olive oil. I think sweeter toppings go well with the strong green taste kale provides.

Below are steps to massage the kale.

Steps:

  1. Take the kale leaves off the step and rip into small pieces.
  2. Put kale pieces in a bowl and pour a small amount of olive oil over them.
  3. Take kale in hands and massage, either by rubbing pieces together between hands or with a massage like motion (like how cats knead a comfy sleeping spot).
  4. Kale is done when it is a bright green color and is sweet and tender to taste. Add your favorite salad toppings and dressings and enjoy!

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My Preferred Topping Options: apples, oranges, strawberries, blueberries, huckleberries, dried cranberries, walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, smoked salmon, shredded carrots, shredded beets

Dressing Options: balsamic vinegar and olive oil, berry vinaigrettes, sweet poppy seed dressings, sweet sesame ginger dressing

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My favorite combo: roasted hazelnuts, dried cranberries, chevre, smoked salmon, balsamic, and olive oil

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Link to info about massaging kale: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/06/18/how-to-massage-kale_n_1601200.html

Uncured Garlic

Week 6 Recipe

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This week’s CSA has a head of uncured garlic in it. At this point, the garlic has fully matured and developed all of its wrappings. I didn’t process the garlic (like the garlic heads you received before) because now there is the option to cure it, which would allow the garlic to be stored for months after this.

If you would like to cure the garlic, hang or place the garlic with the stalk/leaves still attached in a shady and dry place with good aeration. Leave it there for a few weeks; this allows the garlic to dry out, or cure, so that it can be stored over the winter. After a few weeks to a month, remove the leaves and cut the roots short (some wrappings may fall off as well). Now the garlic is cured!

Here are some links to resources about curing garlic:

http://www.gardenbetty.com/2011/07/a-guide-to-curing-and-storing-garlic/ 

http://store.msuextension.org/publications/YardandGarden/MT199904AG.pdf

If you would rather eat the garlic immediately, cut off the stalk/leaves, peel the wrappings, and enjoy!

Below are some photos of the first Beck Creek Gardens garlic harvest of the season. We cure ours in the 3rd floor of the barn.

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Emily harvesting garlic

Garlic in the Barn

Garlic in the Barn

Roasted Cherry, Farro, and Arugula Salad

Week 5 Recipe

Another delicious looking recipe from Adam’s sister! A good opportunity to use some Flathead cherries.

I would substitute farro for any grain or pasta I have on hand: quinoa, rice, or even cous cous. I also think any type of nut would be delicious in this, although I personally prefer walnuts in a salad.

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http://dishingupthedirt.com/recipes/dinner/roasted-cherry-farro-arugula-salad/